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Attorneys, lecturers and researchers are calling for the creation of a particular court docket

Here is their platform. “We lawyers, lawyers, deans, presidents and vice-presidents of universities, law professors, judges, lawyers, researchers of the CNRS support the initiative launched by Gordon Brown and Philippe Sands and call for the creation of a special initiative International Court to bring to justice those responsible for the against the Ukraine to bring to justice the crime of aggression committed. We call on French leaders to join the international movement in favor of this creation. On October 17, Catherine Colonna, Minister for Europe and Foreign Affairs, openly declared herself to be in favor of it “Considerations on an ad hoc tribunal”under two conditions: On the one hand, that it has “an added value” and on the other hand, whether it is “lawfully created”.

Also read – TRIBUNE. “Our fight in Ukraine is yours too”

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However, the added value of such a creation is undeniable. As MM Sands and Brown have already noted, the International Criminal Court will be able to try crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. On the other hand, the crime of aggression falls outside his jurisdiction. This limitation will result in impunity for those who chose to invade Ukraine.

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This border will lead to impunity for those who decided to invade Ukraine

The war currently being waged against Ukraine is crucial to the law in a number of ways. Moreover, if the fate of the people and the Ukrainian nation remains the crucial issue, the entire credibility, effectiveness and legitimacy of the international legal system is under scrutiny. The creation of this tribunal is therefore essential for future peace. The 2003 war in Iraq, also patently illegal, had set an impressive precedent. France felt honored when it denounced this illegality, even if it did not succeed in preventing the outbreak of the conflict.

Not punishing this new aggression means preparing for tomorrow’s world wars and accepting that there will be no redress.

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Also read – War in Ukraine: Volodymyr Zelenskyj announces that more than 10 million Ukrainians are without electricity

In addition, the various solutions envisaged for the creation of this special international court will ensure its full legitimacy. Most provide for the prior adoption of a resolution by the United Nations General Assembly, the symbolic importance of which is very strong given that 193 States are represented there. So there are solutions to counteract the paralysis of the Security Council by the Russian veto and to create a legitimate judiciary.

General de Gaulle’s France took part in the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg. Since then, she has never stopped influencing the international community and the law that governs it. France must participate in the creation of the International Special Court. Otherwise, this movement will be performed without them. Then we would have a lot to lose.

Like Robert Badinter, we know that“One day law students will study the decisions of this special court as the decisions of the Nuremberg tribunal are studied”. We don’t want them to know that day that France has excluded itself from this crucial step for international law. »

First signer:

1. Mathilde Philip-Gay, Professor of Law at the Jean Moulin University of Lyon, Vice-President of the Jean Moulin University of Lyon

2. Marie-Josèphe Laurent, lawyer, President of the Lyon Bar Association

3. Olivier Gout, Dean of the Faculty of Law at the Jean Moulin University in Lyon

4. Eric Carpano, law professor and President of the Jean Moulin University in Lyon

5. Pierre-François Laval, Professor of Law at the Jean Moulin University in Lyon

6. Baptiste Bonnet, Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Saint-Etienne

7. Adrien Bascoulergue, Dean of the Julie-Victoire Daubié Faculty of Law at the Lumière University of Lyon

8. Antoine Garapon, judge and essayist

9. Franck Heurtrey, Attorney at the Lyon Bar Association, Observatory of Public Liberties

10. Gaëlle Marti, Professor of Law at the Jean Moulin University in Lyon

11. Denis Salas, judge and essayist

12. Véronique Champeil-Desplats, Professor of Law at the University of Paris Nanterre, Vice-President of the University in charge of research

13. Régis Fraisse, Honorary Councilor of State

14. Jean-Paul Jean, Honorary Chamber President of the Court of Cassation

15. Xavier Philippe, Professor at the Sorbonne Law School, Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne University

16. Henri Labayle, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Pau and the Adour countries.

17. Dominique Rousseau, Professor Emeritus of Law at the Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

18. Géraldine Giraudeau, Professor of Law at Paris-Saclay

19. Serge Slama, Professor of Law at the University of Grenoble-Alpes

20. Xavier Pin, Professor of Law and Director of the Criminal Law Center at the Jean Moulin University in Lyon

21. Catherine Le Bris, Researcher at the CNRS, Institute of Law and Philosophy at the Sorbonne, University of Paris 1

22. Valère Ndior, Professor of Law at the University of West Brittany

23. Maïté Roche, lawyer at the Lyon Bar Association, Observatory of Public Liberties

24. Noelle Quenivet, Professor of Law at the University of the West of England Bristol

25. Elise Untermaier-Kerléo, Lecturer at the Jean Moulin University of Lyon, Assistant to the Dean

26. Jean-François Barre, lawyer, vice-president of the Lyon Bar

27. Laurent Eck, Lecturer at the Jean Moulin University in Lyon, Assistant to the Dean

28. Caroline Chamard-Heim, Professor at Jean Moulin University

29. Béatrice Bertrand, lawyer, member of the Bar Council, Observatory of Public Liberties

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